Arthritis In Your Pet: Learn How To Recognize The Signs (INFOGRAPHIC & VIDEO)

Arthritis is a very disabling condition that can make your life very difficult. Unfortunately, this degenerative disease can also affect your beloved pet as they get older, the same way it could affect any aging person.

That’s why it’s important to understand this debilitating disease and learn the warning signs so you can recognize this and do anything possible to relieve the symptoms.

Why I decided to write about this

My little Pomeranian girl Myrka will be 11 years old at the end of March and, a few months ago, she began to show signs of arthritis. Fortunately, we have succeeded in relieving her pain by changing her food for another kind with glucosamine and chondroitin to it. For now, she seems to be back to her usual self, so this gave me the idea of sharing what I have discovered about arthritis.

What is arthritis?

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, the definition of arthritis is:

“Inflammation of joints due to infectious, metabolic, or constitutional causes.”

But the term arthritis doesn’t apply to only one disease. This term actually refers to over 100 conditions touching articulations. Affecting 1 in 5 dogs in the United States, arthritis in pets is also the leading cause of chronic pain in adult dogs.

Osteoarthritis

The most common type of arthritis in dogs is known as osteoarthritis (OA) and it is also called degenerative joint disease (DJD). According to PetMD, osteoarthritis definition goes like this:

“The progressive and permanent long-term deterioration of the cartilage surrounding the joints.”

To understand better what happens to the joints when your pet suffers from arthritis, check out this video below. In it, you will see images that show you in great details what happens to the leg’s articulation, the three stages of osteoarthritis as well as the advanced and late stage of OA.

Further information about arthritis

Having a pet that is not feeling his best physically can be very trying for a family. The pain they endure can have an effect on their lifestyle. Your pet may end up having trouble standing, difficulty sitting, walking or getting around, among other things.

These simple movements can cause him terrible pain, and since OA is a degenerative disease, this pain will worsen as the disease progresses. Although osteoarthritis can’t be cured, there are many options available to help control the pain as well as the inflammation.

Please consult a veterinarian is you fear that your pet is suffering from arthritis. The veterinarian will do a complete physical examination, and he will determine the severity of the condition and which treatment is right for your animal.

Arthritis in your pet infographic

That’s why the infographic below, created by PetMart Pharmacy, is the perfect tool so you can learn very helpful information about animal arthritis. In this infographic, you can find three different categories that will help you identify:

  • Signs that your pet may have arthritis
  • Common causes
  • Potential therapy options

Click on infographic to enlarge

Arthritis In Your Pet
http://a.visual.ly/api/embed/107329?width=1200
Source: Visual.ly

Final thoughts

With current research, scientists have discovered that pets, especially dogs, and cats, can be compared to humans when it comes to diseases and treatments. Since I began working at a veterinary clinic, I found out that many medications prescribed for animals are the same ones that you can get at your local pharmacy.

That’s why it’s not surprising that the signs and symptoms of several illnesses that we find in humans can be observed in pets too. We have the perfect example here with osteoarthritis.

Your pet deserves to live his last years as comfortable as possible. If you think he could be suffering from arthritis, don’t hesitate to consult a veterinarian.

Photo credit: AndyMcLemore / CC BY-SA

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8 thoughts on “Arthritis In Your Pet: Learn How To Recognize The Signs (INFOGRAPHIC & VIDEO)

  1. Fabulous post, Nataly and just love the infographic!

    Titan has bad joints and we’ve been battling the “manage” part of it for over 3 years now. He’s been on joint supplements and they help but not to the point of excellence. When he’s real bad he gets an anti-inflammatory to help with that. But recently, I tried this product that my friend Ann at My Pawsitively Pets did a review on. It’s called Rejenease. It’s a liquid that is super fantastic. He’s on his 2nd month and has so much better mobility than before and more energy! It’s like his joint issues disappeared! Not sure if it’s available in Canada but it is awesome. You can find it on Amazon.

    Hope you can find more relief for little Myrka! 😉

    B

    Like

    1. Hey girl!

      Thanks for the tip. I will check it out for sure. If this product is on Amazon, I can probably get it. More importantly, I am very glad that Titan is doing better. Since I put Myrka on this new dog food, she’s doing a lot better. The food is called Hills Prescription Diet j/d Canine Mobility and we saw a big improvement after only two weeks. She is at her second bag now and she’s doing great!

      Have a great weekend, gf! Talk to you soon! 🙂

      Like

  2. Thank you for sharing this Nataly. My furbabies are 5 years old so they’re getting up there in age. I not sure what types of products to get but this was very helpful as did Bren’s comment.

    I hope your furbaby is getting better. Have a great day and weekend!

    Like

    1. Hi Cori!

      I am really glad that this infographic was helpful. I know what it’s like when our furbabies are getting older and aren’t as mobile as before. So far, the new dog food I am feeding her made a big difference. It’s called Hills Prescription Diet j/d Canine Mobility. The product that Bren is talking about seems to be a good solution as well. I’ll check it out for sure.

      Have a great weekend, my friend! 🙂

      Like

  3. Hi Nat —

    This is good info to learn to identify when my baby gets signs of arthritis. He’s still young and super active but I have had several other dogs that battled this and it is so sad. Thanks for sharing. Talk to you soon.

    Irish

    Like

    1. Hi Irish!

      I see so many dogs at the veterinary clinic where I work that suffer from arthritis. That’s why I wanted to share this info with my readers, so people know how to identify the signs.

      It’s really sad when we see our baby getting old and beginning to experience signs of arthritis. And since we are Fibro girls, we both can understand them when they are in pain. Luckily, these new treatments are giving great results. I saw dogs that suffer from arthritis completely changed after the treatments.

      Have a great week ahead, my dear! Talk to you soon! 🙂

      Like

  4. Hi Nataly,

    Informative post and a wonderful infographic too 🙂

    Just like your dog, mine has turned 12 years, and as age creeps, so do the problems. Yes, arthritis is creeping in as he takes time to sit and stand, but otherwise active, though not like he was earlier, which is natural at his age.

    He’s even got stones, so treatment for that’s going on alongside. It’s not easy to medicate your pets, especially my dog – I need to camouflage his doze or he makes out and just won’t take them, and we have to get them injected instead.

    You are right about the medicines being very similar to what we humans take, and that’s another reason why the diseases are very similar to us. My cousin is a vet too, so he tells us the same. In case of emergency, giving medicines we take works just as well for them.

    Thanks for sharing. Have a nice week ahead 🙂

    Like

    1. Hi Harleena,

      I’m so sorry to hear that your furbaby has been sick. I see lots of sick dogs at the veterinary clinic where I work and that totally breaks my heart. But it’s so nice when I see that the treatments work and easy their pain a bit.

      Glad you liked my post and thanks for stopping by, Harleena! I hope that your dog will feel better soon. Have a great week ahead too! 🙂

      Like

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